Trimess

Trimess
FOLLOW THE TWITTER FEED FOR UPDATES

Sunday, February 22, 2015

WES is a categorical failure

But being a total failure hasn't stopped the Trimet leaders from blowing more money on two new trains, hey its tax dollars so let's PARTEE!


Plans for WES expansion: The staff recommends purchasing two additional vehicles for WES, at a cost of $8.5 million, or $13.2 million over 20 years of debt service. All of those costs will cannibalize other general fund programs. I’d suggest that this proposal be pulled from the budget and possibly added back later, after further public vetting
.
WES is TriMet’s most expensive fixed-route service, but I’m not aware of any justification that has ever been offered. Fewer than 1,000 TriMet riders benefit from these subsidies each weekday. Why are WES riders so privileged?
To put the issue in context, below are the costs of WES compared with those of similar bus service offered by SMART of Wilsonville. While WES is undoubtedly a nicer and quicker ride for users, the cost premium is difficult to justify to non-riding taxpayers who have to make up the difference.
Express Service from Wilsonville Station to Beaverton Transit Center


Operating cost/mile Operating cost/hour



TriMet Express Rail $43.74 $949.84
SMART Express Bus $   1.30 $   83.17


In addition, WES is an energy hog. According to a new report by the Federal Railroad Administration, the average energy consumed by all commuter rail systems in America during 2010 was 2,923 British Thermal Units (BTU) per passenger-mile. WES was close to the bottom: It consumed 5,961 BTU per passenger-mile, more than twice the national average (by comparison the top performer was Stockton, CA: 1,907 BTU/passenger-mile).

Not only is WES inefficient compared with its peer group, it is wasteful compared with other modes of travel. The national average for all transit buses in 2010 was 4,240 BTU per passenger-mile; for light-duty cars, the average was 3,364.

WES has always been a planning mistake. Before the Board decides to double-down on failure, there should be careful consideration of an alternative action: terminating service. None of the current board members had anything to do with the original decision, so no one should feel a personal need to defend it. Certainly terminating service would result in some short-term costs because of likely re-payment penalties to the federal government, but at some point the lower operations would provide net benefits to taxpayers (including those outside of TriMet’s district in Wilsonville, who pay TriMet more than $25,000/month to subsidize train operations).

2 comments:

kswiss said...

But please, everyone tell Erik how wrong he is and how he is just a whiner. I've been saying it forever, WES is a commercial and financial flop.

Jason McHuff said...

Max debunked that comparison with the SMART bus. For starters, the SMART bus makes one round trip in the late evening when traffic is light, as well as doesn't serve intermediate points.

The real problem is that the Federal Railroad Administration obstructs smaller commuter rail by requiring vehicles to be built like tanks and two employees to operate even just one. If it could be like MAX, it could run all day for the same amount of money and be more useful.