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Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Mcfarlane trying to pass the buck on light rail flood damage

Mcfarlane is quoted at KGW making a stupid statement 
 The operator of the train was clearly in error driving through the water, agency head Neil McFarlane said in this prepared statement.
Well that excuse might have worked if only one train was damaged but the fact is 13 trains were damaged and that is not the fault of an single  "operator". That is a management failure pure and simple.

AND GUESS WHAT? HERE IS THE TRIMET CONTROLLER ISSUING THE TRAIN ORDER TO GO THROUGH THE FLOOD PROVING IT WAS MANAGEMENT FAILURE

 LISTEN HERE!




The union that represents front-line employees at TriMet says managers ordered MAX trains to proceed through flooded tracks.

During the worst of the heavy rain on Saturday, water gushed into the trains' passenger compartments as they passed through a flooded section of tracks under the Morrison Bridge. Agency security camera footage showed passengers, seemingly in good spirits, trying to stay dry. The MAX lines were later shut down.

But the water damaged 13 trains that, as of Tuesday, were out of service for inspections and repairs. And while the agency says passengers in the insulated cars were safe from the train's electrical systems, the agency president disagreed.

"When you've got those trains that have all that voltage going through high water ... that's totally unacceptable," said Shirley Block, the president of the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 757. "That's a safety issue, and TriMet's not being up front about it."

She said she raised the issue because she doesn't want to see an operator or a controller disciplined for a manager's mistake.

TriMet said Monday it's conducting an internal investigation into the decision to run the train through high water. In a statement, General Manager Neil McFarlane said "it is clear that an error in judgment was made," but he did not specify by whom.

TriMet said it was preparing a response, but did not immediately comment on the union's allegations.

The Oregon Department of Transportation, which acts as TriMet's overseeing agency on behalf of the Federal Transit Administration, is participating in the investigation.

 TriMet managers ordered MAX through flooded tracks, union says | OregonLive.com

And over at KGW the dickhead is trying to blame an operator. Of course he's lying through is teeth again because 13 trains were damamged which means that multiple operators went through the flood which then means a manager either wasn't paying attention of just f*kd up.


The agency also provided video from within the train that shows passengers hopping up onto seats with grab rails as water gushes into the carriage.
The operator of the train was clearly in error driving through the water, agency head Neil McFarlane said in this prepared statement.
While conditions were changing rapidly during Saturday’s heavy rain storm, it is clear that  an error in judgment was made to advance that train through standing water of that depth.  We are conducting an internal investigation to determine if appropriate protocols were followed, and/or if the protocols need to be changed given this incident. We are also working with the Oregon Department of Transportation on this review, as ODOT is the oversight agency on behalf of the Federal Transit Administration.
Meanwhile, TriMet operators union president Shirley Block told KGW that a manager told the MAX operator to drive through the high water.
A rider, Huy Yang, said he shot this on-board video October 31.
"It's crazy, but trust me, the train is safer than driving yourself. Imagine that flooding happening inside your car. you probably would be dead. Inside the train at least you are a little safer," said Portlander Tresor Kukena, after watching the video. He often rides the train.
Other riders voiced concerns about electrocution, after watching the video. A TriMet spokesperson says although there are electrical components on the train, they are insulated, and says the riders were not in any danger.
 TriMet officials, union statements clash in MAX flood video



4 comments:

Erik H. said...

"It's crazy, but trust me, the train is safer than driving yourself. Imagine that flooding happening inside your car. you probably would be dead. Inside the train at least you are a little safer," said Portlander Tresor Kukena, after watching the video. He often rides the train.

Actually, you'd be safer in the car. Your car would stall out, but you wouldn't run any risk of electrocution.

If you want to argue that the size of the train makes it safer, tell that to the Union Pacific:

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/151024103153-train-derailment-texas-flood-newday-00000000-large-169.jpg

And I believe those locomotives are also written off.

Jason McHuff said...

Unless I'm mistaken, that train order was for what to do generally and was not specifically for situation as it existed.

And Erik, I was impressed by pictures of that knocked over train when I had seen it, but I'm pretty sure that was caused by rushing water, whereas under the Morrison Bridge it was just a bathtub of standing water with nowhere to go.

Overall, it would be good to know what the train order and other procedures say regarding water height. There definitely was a push to continue service. Moreover, my recollection of Saturday was that a supervisor had checked on the underpass and declared it OK, then was called somewhere else after which the water had risen.

Also, it's unclear whether the "13 trains" were ones that had been dragged through the underpass pool, and whether they were damaged or held for inspection as a precaution. Moreover, is it actually 13 2-car trains or 13 cars? It's confusing because they could easily decide to hold entire trains, and of course the newer trains have to have two cars. But the older cars can run individually.

Al M said...

Mcfarlane should have just admitted this was an institutional error instead of attempting to put this on an operator.

They are such liars about everything of course we are going to jump all over them.

Trimet execs don't even know how to be truthful. It's not in their DNA

Jason McHuff said...

Regarding the underpass specifically, I think the operator(s) should have stood up and resisted going through it earlier and/or more firmly (it is clear in the video in your previous post that the water is quite high, and operators should be familiar with the area), but I do believe that they thought they were authorized or instructed to do so.

Speaking generally, I agree that individuals can't be totally blamed for making a certain mistake when multiple people are making the same mistake.