Screwing our retirees is HOW WE ROLL

Screwing our retirees is HOW WE ROLL

Friday, February 3, 2012

Trimet blows it

 But now there's a problem: TriMet's government affairs staff apparently fell asleep at the wheel during the 2011 Legislature. Until last month, the agency was oblivious to a new law – signed by Gov. John Kitzhaber last June– that ended TriMet's ability to collect money from fines.

Since Jan. 1, the money that once went to the agency has been funneled into a state public-safety fund created by House Bill 2712.

Now, anticipating a sudden loss of about $250,000 this year, TriMet is lobbying hard for an amendment during the current, abbreviated legislative session. The agency is already facing a budget gap of up to $17 million.


New law undercuts TriMet's effort to boost revenue through fare-cheat fines

3 comments:

Erik H. said...

Here's a working link:
New law undercuts TriMet's effort to boost revenue through fare-cheat fines

Erik H. said...

TriMet expected to raise $125,000, but is now out $250,000 because it "fell asleep at the wheel".

Nevermind, that TriMet has a "Government Affairs" department consisting of one Executive Director Olivia N. Clark who made a reported $160,966.18 in compensation in 2008/2009, one Analyst Aaron Deas worth $73,280.20 to TriMet, and one Coordinator II Jared Anderson, worth $57,485.74 to TriMet.

The combined salaries of the three men and women whose sole job was to know this law was circulating around the State Capitol is $291,732.15.

Kind of ironic how their salary matches TriMet's newly found shortfall.

What will TriMet do?

The RIGHT thing to do is to have these three folks terminated...

The anticipated TriMet response will be to cut another bus line.

Al M said...

Nope, no accountability for management. Just bus operators.