Trimess

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Wednesday, January 30, 2013

VIDEO OF TRIMET 3000 SERIES BLIND SPOTS

4 comments:

h. h. said...

Something is wrong here ...this can't be an illustration of a Trimet 3000 when it appears to be taken in Seattle inside of an older Gillig Phantom. Am I missing something?

h. h. said...

…even though the description of this video is wrong, it’s an excellent illustration of what a “blind spot” is created by a thick windshield pillar. NOW, imagine if that left mirror was mounted higher and was longer how much more blockage of vision there would be. That was how the original Seattle King County Gillig Phantoms were configured when they first came on the property in the late 1990s. Thankfully, they retrofitted all those Gilligs with shorter mirror housings and mounted them lower so they aren’t at the same level as the driver’s line of sight. We will never know how many pedestrian lives were saved from left-turning buses by Metro management listening to their drivers and at least taking some action. Has Trimet done anything about the mounting position or size of their left mirrors?

Erik H. said...

Definitely Seattle, the second shot is at Coleman Dock (the WSF Terminal) on Alaskan Way.

h. h. said...

You're absolutely right, Erik.

And the beginning of the video is of a left turn from eastbound Yesler Way to northbound Third Avenue in downtown Seattle.